June 2013

Critter Caretakers Pet Sitting Seen in the AZ Republic

Well this is exciting. Our pet sitting company was interviewed as part of an article for the AZ Republic on what to do with your pets when you travel. The article showed several different options for pet owners and their pets. Our company was shown as the stay-at-home option, which of course we feel is the best option for most of the pets out there! We had a photographer come to one of our visits and take our picture (A LOT) with the pets we were currently visiting and then talk to us about why we loved pet sitting (why *don’t* we love it?), why we felt in-home pet sitting was a good option for client’s pets, and the most unusual pet sitting experience we had.  It was quite fun! If you’d like to see the full article, please click here: http://www.azcentral.com/home/articles/20130603phoenix-options-pet-care-vacation.html ...

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What do you do if you suspect heat stroke? PART 2

Yesterday we discussed the signs of heat stroke in dogs. Today we will talk about what to do if you suspect your dog may have heat stroke. First get the dog out of the sun/heat immediately.  Ideally you take your dog’s rectal temperature every 10 minutes to monitor body temperature. If it is above 103 you should take your dog to the vet immediately as this should be considered an emergency! If below 103, you can place the dog in cool, not icy water.  Icy water may cause the blood vessels to constrict and inadvertently keep the body from cooling.  You can also place a fan in front of the dog to aid in cooling. Do not put wet towels on the dog though since this may actually trap body heat as the towels become room temperature. You should continue cooling your dog until the body temperature reaches 103. At that point...

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What are signs of heat stroke/exhaustion in dogs? PART 1

Since we live in a very warm climate in Arizona, it’s important for us Mesa dog sitters/owners to know the signs of heat stroke.  Heat stroke is a very serious condition that occurs rapidly and can cause collapse and death if not treated immediately. Certain short nosed breeds are more susceptible to this condition and should be monitored even more carefully, as are larger dogs, older dogs and puppies. Some of these short nosed breeds are the Pekinese, the Pug and the Bulldog. You should also monitor dogs with longer, thicker hair and black coated dogs. Dogs do not sweat through their skin glands like we do; they cool themselves by panting.  The potential for this condition to strike occurs when the air temperature is warmer than the dog’s body temperature (typically between 101 and 102 degrees) and panting is not sufficient enough for the dog to cool themselves. This is why...

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The most difficult part of pet sitting

Critter Caretakers gets to pet sit for all kinds of animals in Mesa and Gilbert. We’re dog pet sitters, cat sitters, ferret sitters, rabbit sitters, goat sitters, chicken sitters; well you get the idea.  But regardless of what kinds of pets we pet sit for, there is one thing that is absolutely, positively THE most difficult part of pet sitting. And that is when we have to say good-bye to one of the pets we’ve watched because it’s their time to cross the Rainbow Bridge. One of my most recent pet sitting jobs in Gilbert over Memorial Day was with a cat named Baxter. Prior to his visits, his beloved owner had shared with me that he wasn’t doing his best, had slowed down considerably and was not eating as well as he used to. So I was aware of all these things going into the sit. But when his visits...

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